Non-profit

Murphy, Hesse, Toomey & Lehane, LLP, has decades of experience representing non-profits throughout New England.  We represent some of the largest non-profits in the region as well as many smaller organizations – our firm has the flexibility to provide for the needs of all non-profit entities.

We have extensive experience representing the following non-profit sectors:

  • Arts & Culture
  • Education & Youth
  • Environment
  • Health
  • Housing/Community Development
  • Human Services
  • Philanthropy

We represent these entities in a wide array of matters including:

  • Formation and incorporation
  • Tax exemption issues
  • Fiduciary duties
  • Board governance
  • Labor, employment and benefit plan issues
  • The relationship between public and private entities
  • Contract negotiations
  • Medicare and Medicaid compliance
  • Unrelated business taxable income issues/maintenance of non-profit status
  • Fundraising compliance issues
  • Department of education/student loan compliance issues

Our reasonable rates combined with our extensive experience in non-profit business law, employment and benefits law, and governmental law ensures that our non-profit clients receive the best possible representation designed to further the successes of their organizations.  We do well for those who do good.

For more information about our non-profit practice area, please contact: 

Katherine A. Hesse
617-479-5000
khesse@mhtl.com

What's Happening @ MHTL?

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MHTL Appoints Charles Desmond to Advisory Board

Murphy, Hesse, Toomey & Lehane is pleased to announce that Dr. Charles F. Desmond, CEO of Inversant and a senior fellow at the New England Board of Higher Education, has accepted an appointment to the MHTL Advisory Board.

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Legal Updates

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Hazy Guidance for Employers: Attorney General Sessions Issues Marijuana Enforcement Memorandum to Federal Prosecutors

On January 4, 2018, Attorney General Jefferson Sessions issued a memorandum rescinding several Obama-era policies that discouraged federal prosecutors from pursuing marijuana possession and distribution cases in marijuana legalization states like Massachusetts. The Obama-era policies were backed by a Congressional budget rider that bars the Department of Justice from spending its money prosecuting state backed medical marijuana operations. The amendment will expire later this month, and it is unclear whether Congress will renew it given the Trump administration’s current priorities.

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