News

Murphy, Hesse, Toomey & Lehane, LLP Partners Present for the Cape Cod Human Resources Association

 

Murphy, Hesse, Toomey & Lehane, LLP Partners Kier Wachterhauser and Sarah Spatafore spoke at the Cape Cod Human Resources Association (“CCHRA”) on September 22, 2022, providing an overview of the top legal issues facing employers today. The focus of the presentation to HR administrators and employers was an update on new case law and regulatory changes that employers should know, and a discussion on hiring in a tight labor market, including how to avoid legal pitfalls now and later.

 

Mr. Wachterhauser is a Partner at MHTL and represents private and public sector clients in all areas of labor and employment law while maintaining a general litigation practice within the firm.  He regularly counsels clients on employment matters, including wage and hour, leave entitlements, and discrimination and harassment matters, as well as the drafting of employment policies and contracts, and represents clients in employment-related litigation before state and federal courts and administrative bodies. Additionally, he maintains an extensive labor practice, representing clients in the collective bargaining process, arbitration hearings, and proceedings in front of a variety of administrative agencies. He is a regular speaker at industry and trade groups, chambers of commerce, and other organizations on a wide range of labor and employment topics, and he conducts workplace training for organizations of all sizes. Mr. Wachterhauser received his Juris Doctor from Boston University School of Law, where he served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Boston University Law Review.

 

Ms. Spatafore practices primarily in the labor and employment area, representing both public and private clients. Additionally, she handles cases within the Firm’s education law practice. Ms. Spatafore has represented clients before a number of courts and administrative tribunals at both the state and federal level.  She regularly conducts seminars and training programs on unlawful harassment, preventing discrimination, and a variety of other labor and employment issues, and she has completed all the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination-certified “Train-the-Trainer” courses. Ms. Spatafore graduated from Bates College in 2007 and received her Juris Doctor, with Honors, from Boston College Law School in 2012. While in law school, Ms. Spatafore interned at the Massachusetts Superior Court and was a member of the Jessup International Moot Court team. She was a co-recipient of the third year best oralist award at Boston College Law School. Ms. Spatafore is admitted to practice in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, and the United States Court of Appeals First Circuit.

 

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