Attorneys & Professionals

Andrew J. Waugh

TEL: (617) 479-5000
EMAIL: awaugh@mhtl.com

General counsel to a number of towns and school committees, Mr. Waugh's practice focuses on education and municipal law, with an emphasis labor and employment matters. Mr. Waugh works with and advises employers on various employment matters including hiring, discipline and termination issues, drafting severance agreements, FMLA and ADA issues, and compliance with other state and federal discrimination and/or civil rights laws. Mr. Waugh has extensive experience negotiating and drafting collective bargaining agreements, and he defends employers in grievance arbitrations and unfair labor practice charges on a regular basis. He has represented clients at the trial and appellate level in state court and before a broad range of administrative agencies. He also regularly conducts seminars and workshops for clients on a variety of legal topics. Mr. Waugh currently serves on the Finance Committee for the Town of Dover, MA.  Mr. Waugh began his career as a judicial law clerk to the Justices of the New Hampshire Superior Court. Mr. Waugh is a graduate of Middlebury College and Suffolk University Law School. He is a member of the Massachusetts and New Hampshire Bar Associations and is admitted to practice law in the state and federal courts in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

What's Happening @ MHTL?

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MHTL Appoints Charles Desmond to Advisory Board

Murphy, Hesse, Toomey & Lehane is pleased to announce that Dr. Charles F. Desmond, CEO of Inversant and a senior fellow at the New England Board of Higher Education, has accepted an appointment to the MHTL Advisory Board.

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Legal Updates

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Hazy Guidance for Employers: Attorney General Sessions Issues Marijuana Enforcement Memorandum to Federal Prosecutors

On January 4, 2018, Attorney General Jefferson Sessions issued a memorandum rescinding several Obama-era policies that discouraged federal prosecutors from pursuing marijuana possession and distribution cases in marijuana legalization states like Massachusetts. The Obama-era policies were backed by a Congressional budget rider that bars the Department of Justice from spending its money prosecuting state backed medical marijuana operations. The amendment will expire later this month, and it is unclear whether Congress will renew it given the Trump administration’s current priorities.

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